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Salary Forecast: Director of Finance Salary

by Steve Johnson 06/08/2018 0 comments

Directors of finance and finance directors both handle financial considerations of an organization, but they have different concentrations. While some of their duties overlap, some of them do not, and this results in a difference in their overall salary.

Financial Managers

Financial managers are in charge of managing and recording expenses in a certain department or for the entire company, according to Study.com. They create reports at different intervals of the year. Higher levels of management then use those reports to see if the company’s revenues and profits are on the rise. Financial managers may also be known by other titles, like risk managers and controllers. They identify patterns in financial data and make judgments in the interests of the company based on those trends.]

Directors of Finance

On the other hand, financial directors are in charge of putting into place the policies that determine how the company will use the money. They have responsibilities like setting budgets for each department or handling strategic planning to help a company get ready for a certain economic environment. They also use reports from financial managers to find losses and change the negative flow of cash in a company.

Salary

For comparison purposes, the mean annual salary of a financial manager was $143,530, as of May 2017, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The BLS does not have specific data for the salaries of directors of finance, so this information is for comparison purposes only.

That said, the median annual salary was $125,080, or $60.14 per hour. Those in the tenth percentile earned $66,480 per year or $31.96 per hour, and those in the 75 percentile earned $173,920 per year or $83.62 per hour.

The average base pay of directors of finance is $142,876 per year, according to Glassdoor data. The additional cash compensation averages $26,181, and the range for additional cash compensation is between $9,401 and $57,269. So there is a lot of variation in the actual salary that either a financial manager or a director of finance could earn. Indeed.com puts the average annual salary at $100,208 per year, based on 6,094 anonymous salaries for director of finance employees and job advertisements on the site in the previous three years.

In a company with zero to 50 employees, the average base pay is $102,403, and the additional cash compensation ranges between $7,439 and $44,280. A company with between 201 to 500 employees, by contrast, has the average base pay of $130,894 per year, with an additional cash compensation of between $8,791 and $53,839.

Years of relevant experience can affect salary like company size. The average base pay of a director of finance is $115,107 per year in a company with 201-500 employees, and the additional cash compensation ranges between $8,029 and $48,358. That increases to an average base pay of $127,369 and an additional cash compensation range of between $8,578 and $52,381 per year. With between 10 and 14 years of experience in a company of the same size, the average base pay increases to $141,898, and an additional cash compensation of between $9326 and $57,752 per year.

Typically, the smaller the company, the lower the salary. Other factors that can affect average base pay and additional cash compensation include region and industry.

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How Payrolling Can Help Your Business Thrive

by Steve Johnson 06/01/2018 0 comments

Dealing with payroll can be a nightmare and take a lot of time and energy away from other business activities you or your employees could be doing. Instead of trying to figure out the hours worked for each employee, you could be trying to find new clients and maintaining the relationships you currently have.

To help your company grow and develop, payrolling is a cost-effective tool that empowers you to transfer some or all of your employees to the payrolling company. This type of business provides payrolling services and is responsible for activities like bringing new-hires on board, verifying eligibility to work and keeping records of employee paperwork. It also distributes checks and handles direct deposits. All of these activities take a significant amount of time and effort to do, and payrolling companies make sure that you will be able to focus on your organization’s other, more important work.

Additionally, they ensure that all relevant taxes are paid and process tax returns. They also handle liabilities, including workers’ compensation, insurance, and claims of injuries on the job. You can also avoid dealing with unemployment when you utilize their payrolling services. They will make sure that all of these types of instances are taken care of professionally.

So when should you think about using payrolling services? You should consider using payrolling services when you bring on temporary, contract, or seasonal staff members. When you work with experts on certain projects, payrolling can also be helpful. Additionally, payrolling is helpful if you hire workers to fulfill requirements of a grant as a nonprofit organization to help you avoid artificially upping your staff budget.

Furthermore, during a new employee’s probationary period, payrolling can help protect you against claims of unemployment. Payrolling also helps keep you from getting in trouble with the IRS for misclassifying 1099 contract workers. If you misclassify workers, your organization can face significant penalties that could severely damage its reputation and budget.

As liability and insurance costs are constantly on the rise, payrolling can lower your cost of onboarding. There is no risk to your organization for using payrolling services. You don’t have to deal with trying to keep up with labor laws and regulations that change all the time. Payrolling companies will handle all that for you so you can avoid worrying about if you have all the latest information on how to hire and manage employees.

Payrolling services businesses maintain your payroll records carefully. This should be done by people who know how to meticulously follow laws and regulations about payroll records. If you don’t have an HR department, or it is a small one, a payrolling company can be a valuable and knowledgeable partner to support your work.

They also work quickly and efficiently, so you don’t have to worry about your staff members not being paid on time. They will be your payrolling partner so you can focus on what you do best: take care of your clients. You will free yourself from many of the daily operational hassles of handling the payroll of your staff when you work with a payrolling company. They will take care of the needs of your organization and your staff members.

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Using a Staffing Firm as an Extension of Your In-House Team

by Steve Johnson 05/25/2018 0 comments

Even if your organization has a talent acquisition team, you may not be able to reach the best potential employees through the efforts of this team alone. With a staffing firm, you extend your reach significantly, and you have access to individuals who may not even have been thinking about looking for a new position, individuals who can help your organization thrive and succeed.

A recruitment firm is always moving and networking, particularly in the fields in which they specialize. They know the movers and shakers, and they know who the rising and established talent figures are in each company. With this knowledge and access, they know who is working in the field and when the right time is to approach them with a new offer.

Passive candidates who might not be currently searching for a position or frequenting job boards are a potential group of people that your company may not have access to without working with a staffing firm. Your company could be just the place that they have been wanting to work for.

Staffing organizations also take the time to get to know your company and its particular goals for recruitment. They learn about your company culture, mission, vision, and other particulars necessary to make the right match between new employee and organization. They are committed to finding the right person for the job.

You obviously don’t want to hire just anyone for an open position. A staffing firm’s expertise can help narrow down the list of potential candidates so that you can select from the best in your industry, even if they’re working somewhere else currently. This makes the entire hiring process so much easier for you.

Your organization saves time and energy posting an open position and then interviewing candidates when it works directly with a staffing firm. You only meet with the best of the best from the already-small pool of candidates and then make your selection based on who you think is a perfect fit.

Working with a recruiting partner can also save your company a lot of money. You can avoid paying for posting the job online in various places and for employees’ time for the hiring and interviewing process. You get right to the heart of the issue with a staffing company: finding the right individual to start working in an open position as soon as possible. You also potentially save money on training by working with a recruiting company because it can help find the people with the right skills and experience that a traditional recruitment campaign might overlook.

Going it alone in the talent acquisition field can be daunting, and without the right expertise to guide your organization, it may miss out on the best person for a certain project or team. Partner with a staffing firm to help you identify and hire the most talented and skilled people in your industry. Put the firm’s industry connections and knowledge of the field to work for you.

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Pay-rolling and the Pitfalls of Contract Workers

by Michael Pomposello 05/18/2018 0 comments

It can be really tempting to hire contract workers. However, in the end, it is generally a better idea to work with a regularly-hired employee. You can end up saving yourself a lot of hassle and headache by working with an employee instead of an independent contractor.

Benefits

First, consider the advantages of working with independent contractors. You’re likely to save your company a lot of money working with them since you don’t have to deal with paying for benefits, and, if the contractor is using their own equipment and space, you save that money, too. You can also avoid not paying your part of their Social Security and Medicare taxes, among other taxes and insurance, like unemployment and workers’ comp insurance. According to Forbes, this can raise your payroll costs by 20 to 30 percent, and maybe even more.

You can also hire contractors just for specific projects if your workload is higher at some times than others. You avoid the trouble of firings and layoffs. Additionally, contractors bring their specific knowledge to the job, which means you don’t have to spend time and money training. You can also avoid potential lawsuits for overtime compensation, discrimination, taking time off to care for a sick family member or to be with a new child.

Disadvantages

Now that you know the upsides of hiring independent contractors, consider why working with them may not be all it’s cracked up to be.

For one thing, you don’t have as much control over your workers as you might like, meaning you can’t micromanage and direct the way you (may) do your employees. Contractors have some autonomy to do their work in a way that is best for them. If you get too involved in what they’re doing, they start looking like an employee to the IRS. The Bureau of National Affairs, in the September 9, 2009 “Daily Tax Report” states that “.  . .behavioral control is arguably the most important” factor in determining whether someone should be classified as an employee or contractor.

Another factor to consider is that your contractors will not provide the permanency of a regular workforce. All the new people in and out can decrease efficiency and cause some trouble in the work environment. Moreover, your right to terminate a contractor depends on the contract you’ve both signed. Also, if your contractor gets hurt on the job, they can sue for damages, unlike an employee, who is covered by workers’ comp insurance.

Whatever a contractor creates for your company may not exclusively be yours, either, unless there is a written agreement moving the ownership from the contractor to the organization. Employees who create something for a company automatically give up the copyright to the employer in most cases.

You may also face more audits from the government if you have a staff of mostly contractors. They may think you have misclassified them, and that can land you in trouble, not only with the IRS, but also with other federal agencies. The Bureau of National Affairs advises that “Employers who misclassify workers as independent contractors can end up with substantial tax bills. Additionally, they can face penalties to pay employment taxes and for failing to file required tax forms.”

So think hard before you decide to hire contractors instead of employees. In the end, it is likely better for your organisation to hire employees. If you’re not sure about whether to classify someone as a contractor or employee, the BNS that you consider the level of behavioral and financial control the organization has over the worker, and the type of relationship.

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Salary Forecast: Digital Director

by Michael Pomposello 05/11/2018 0 comments

A digital director is in a unique position as this person combines business and technology to help an organization succeed. Working with business managers, they advance technological function in an organization and help the organization meet its business goals.  They identify solutions for the organization using technology that will boost its profitability and propel the organization to success using innovative technology when possible.

National Salary

The Bureau of Labor Statistics categorizes digital directors under the occupation of Computer Systems Analysts. These individuals earn a mean hourly wage of $44.59, or $92,740 per year, as of May 2017. The median hourly wage is $42.44, or $88,270 per year. Those in the tenth percentile earn $25.84 per hour, or $53,750 per year. Those in the 90th percentile earn $67.24 per hour, or $139,850 per year.

Salary by State

The state with the highest average pay for this position is New Jersey, where the hourly mean wage is $50.84, or $105,750 per year. The District of Columbia comes in second with an average hourly wage of $50.47, or $104,970 per year. New York is in third with an hourly average wage of $49.78, or $103,550 per year. California pays $49.45 per year, on average, or $102,860 annually. In fifth place is Virginia, where the average hourly wage is $48.12, or $100,090 per year.

Salary by Metro Area

Head to California if you want to earn some of the highest salaries in the nation as a digital director. San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, CA is the highest-paying metro area in the country at $58.84 per hour, on average, or $122,380 per year. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA comes in next at $56.74 per hour, on average, or $118,010. While third place belongs to New York-Jersey City, White Plains, NY-NY ($55.18 per hour, on average, or $114,760 per year), fourth place is again in California: Oxnard-Thousand Oaks-Ventura, CA, where the average hourly wage is $53.82, or $111,940 per year. Danbury, Connecticut holds fifth place at $52.55 per hour, on average, or $109,300 per year.

Salary by Non-Metro Area

Move to the Los Alamos County, New Mexico non-metropolitan area if you want to earn the highest salary for digital directors in non-metro areas in the nation. There, the hourly mean wage is $48.37, or $100,610 per year. The Northeast Virginia non-metro area is also a great place to go. There the hourly mean wage is $45.05, or $93,700 per year. In the West Northwestern Ohio non-metro area, the hourly mean wage is the third-highest in the country for non-metro areas at $44.80 per hour, on average, or $93,180 per year. The Southeast Coastal North Carolina non-metro area pays $43.44 per hour, on average, or $90,350 per year, so you’ll earn a great salary there as well. If you move to the Northern Mountains Region of California non-metro area, the hourly mean wage is $42.87, or $89,180 annually.

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Salary Forecast: Senior Server Developer

by Michael Pomposello 05/04/2018 0 comments

A server developer works with a team to design and create an organization’s product platform from the ground up. They help move the organization forward and to the top of new technologies like social gaming by utilizing the best of emerging technology on the server side. They are skilled in applying big data and AI technology, like high scalable cloud-based infrastructure, stream analysis, and machine learning.

Glassdoor offers some insight into the salaries of senior server developers. The average base pay is $100,271 per year, according to Glassdoor, and those in the tenth percentile earn $76,000 annually. Those in the 90th percentile earn $125,000 per year.

Indeed estimates the salary of a senior server developers to be about $85,000 (of 1,022 jobs in its database with that title). Eight hundred eighty jobs in the database had a salary of $95,000, while 646 paid $105,000 per year. Nearly 440 paid $115,000 per year, and 200 had salaries of $130,000.

While the Bureau of Labor Statistics does not have salary data for this particular job title, the work of a server developer is closest in their categorization to that of a software developer. Systems software developers (vs. applications software developers) earn an annual average salary of $111,780 per year, or $53.74 per hour, as of May 2017. The median annual salary is $107,600, and the median hourly wage is $51.73.  Those in the 10th percentile earn $31.57 per hour, or $65,670 per year, while those in the 90th percentile earn a salary of $164,150 annually, or $78.92 per hour. The 25th percentile earns $84,290 per year, or $40.53 per hour. The 75th percentile earns $135,740 per year, or $65.26 per hour.

To get the highest-paying job, you want to work in the right industry. The Radio and Television Broadcasting industry pays the highest salary for systems software developers at a mean hourly wage of $64.23, or $133,600 per year. Cable and Other Subscription Programming pays an average of $128,530, or $61.79 per hour. Semiconductor and Other Electronic Component Manufacturing pays an average of $60.98 per hour, or $126,840 per year.

Another important factor in the salary you earn is where you live. California pays the highest in the nation for systems software developers at an hourly average wage of $61.17, or $127,230 per year. New Hampshire is in second place at $59.04 per hour, or $122,810 per year. Colorado is next at $58.73 per hour, on average, or $122,170 per year. Delaware is in fourth place at $58.68 per hour, on average, or $122,050 per year. Fifth place belongs to Virginia at $58.44 per hour, or $121,560 per year, on average.

As a senior server developer, therefore, it seems safe to say that you can expect a salary of perhaps between about $85,000 and a bit over $100,000 per year. Depending on your specific skill set, years of experience, employer, industry, and region where you plan to work, you may earn up to around $130,000 per year.

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Salary Forecast: Cost Accountant

by Michael Pomposello 04/27/2018 0 comments

Cost accountants specialize in identifying costs in the supply chain of the product or service of their company. They also handle costs in a variety of areas, such as human resources, administration, shipping, and production. In general, accountants work to find ways to reduce costs and boost revenues, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The BLS categorizes cost accountants as “management accountants” and state that they “record and analyze the financial information of the organizations for which they work” and provide that information to business managers.

Salary at the National Level

If you work as a cost accountant, your average annual salary, if it is in line with the national average, will be $77,920, or $37.46 per hour, according to the BLS, as of May 2017. The median annual income is $69,350, or $33.34 per hour. Those in the 10th percentile earn $43,020 per year, or $20.68 per hour. The 90th percentile earns $122,220 per year, or $58.76 per hour.

Salary by Industry

Other Pipeline Transportation pays an average of $47.31 per hour, or $98,400 per year, on average. The Federal Executive Branch pays an hourly mean wage of $47.26 per hour, or $98,300 per year, on average. Securities, Commodity Contracts, and Other Financial Investments and Related Activities pays an hourly mean wage of $45.47, or $94,570 per year, and Pipeline Transportation of Crude Oil pays an average hourly wage of $43.83, or $91,170. Natural gas distribution pays an annual average salary of $90,980, or $43.74 per hour.

Salary by State

The District of Columbia is the highest-paying state at $96,880 on average, or $46.58 per hour, on average. New York comes in next at $95,430 per year, on average, or $45.88 per hour. New Jersey has an average mean salary of $91,400 per year, or $43.94 per hour. Virginia cost accountant employers pay an annual mean wage of $84,740 per year, or $40.74 per hour. California has an hourly mean wage of $40.16, or $83,540 annually.

Salary by Metro Area

Head to San Rafael, CA to live in the highest-paying metropolitan division in the U.S. The hourly mean wage there is $50.99, and the annual mean wage is $106,050. The New York-Jersey City-White Plains, NY-NJ metro division comes in second place at $101,520 per year, on average, or $48.81 per hour. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA pays an average of $97,910 per year, on average, or $47.07 per hour. If you are more into cold climates, try Fairbanks, AK, where the annual average salary is $94,680, or $45.52 per hour.

Salary by Non-Metro Area

The Northwest Virginia non-metro area is $106,460 per year on average, or $51.18 per hour. The Southeast Alaska non-metro area pays an average annual salary of $84,700, or $40.72 per hour. The East Central New York non-metro area has an average annual salary of $82,590, or $39.71 per hour. The non-metro area in Los Alamos County, New Mexico pays an average annual salary of $81,450, or $39.16 per hour.

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Salary Forecast: Credit and Collections Representative

by Steve Johnson 04/20/2018 0 comments

A credit and collections representative, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, typically calls individuals and businesses who are overdue on their bills. They use investigative tools like the Internet, post office, credit bureaus, or neighbors to find out where they live before they call. When they do call (or perhaps email), they let them know that they have an overdue bill, and they try to negotiate a payment. The work can be stressful because people often become angry when they are faced with having to pay a debt.

Salaries at the National Level

The mean hourly wage for this position is $18.10, as of May 2017, according to BLS data. The annual average salary is $37,650. The median annual salary is $35,330, and those in the lowest tenth percentile earn $11.50 per hour, or $23,920 per year. Those in the 90th percentile earn $26.45 per hour, or $55,020 per year.

Salary by Industry

The highest paying industry for credit and collections representatives is Natural Gas Distribution at a mean hourly wage of $29.33, or $61,000 per year. Electric Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution pays an average of $24.57 per hour, or $51,110 per year. Water, Sewage, and Other Systems has an average hourly wage of $24.37, or $50,680 per year. Audio and Video Equipment Manufacturing has an hourly mean wage of $23.93, and the annual mean wage is $49,770, while Other Specialty Trade Contractors pays $23.87 per hour, on average, or $49,650 per year, on average.

Salary by State

Move to the District of Columbia to earn the highest salary for this occupation in the country. The annual mean wage there is $63,570, or $30.56 per hour. In Connecticut, the hourly mean wage is $22.34, or $46,470 annually. The third highest-paying state is Massachusetts at $21.49 per hour, on average, or $44,700 per year. New Jersey comes in fourth place at $21.11 per hour, on average, or $43,920 per hour.

Salary by Metro Area

The award for the highest-paying metro area for this occupation is Lowell-Billerica-Chelmsford, MA-NH, where the hourly mean wage is $27.11, and the average annual salary is $56,390. The Newark, NJ-PA metro area comes next at $26.96 per hour, on average, or $56,080. The Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT metro area pays an average of $25.72, or $53,500 per hour. Fourth place belongs to Napa, CA at $24.21 per hour, on average, or $50,350 per year.

Salary by Non-Metro Area

The Northwest Colorado non-metro area pays the highest among non-metro areas with an annual average salary of $24.06, or $50,040 per year. The North Coast Region of California comes in second place at $22.43 per hour, on average, or $46,650 annually. The Southwest Washington non-metro area pays $22.11 per hour, on average, and the average annual salary there is $45,990. Finally, Southwest Wyoming is a great place to be because the average hourly wage is $21.56, or $44,850 per year.

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Salary Forecast: UNIX / Linux Engineers

by Steve Johnson 03/30/2018 0 comments

While UNIX is copyrighted, Linux can be considered a “UNIX clone,” according to CyberCiti.biz. Furthermore, TechWorm.net notes that “While Linux is an open source, free to use operating system widely used for computer hardware and software, game development, tablet PCS, mainframes, Unix is a proprietary operating system commonly used in internet servers, workstations and PCs by Solaris, Intel, HP etc.”

When considering network engineers for the purposes of occupational classification and salary, the Bureau of Labor Statistics lumps network architects and network engineers in the same job category.

Salary

The hourly mean wage of a network engineer was $50.12, or $104,240, according to the BLS, as of May 2016. The average annual salary was $104,240. Those earning in the 50th percentile made $48.66 per hour, on average, and $101,210 per year. Those earning in the lowest 10th percentile made an average of $26.74 per hour, or $55,610 per year. The 90th percentile made $76.25 per hour, on average, or $158,590 per year.

Salary by Industry

If you want to earn the highest possible salary for network engineers, consider working in the Specialized Design Services industry, where the average hourly salary was $84.57, or $175,900 per year. Next, consider the Semiconductor and Other Electronic Component Manufacturing industry, where the hourly wage was $68.14, or $141,740 per year. Next, in third place was the Commercial and Service Industry Machinery Manufacturing Industry, where the hourly average wage was $61.81, or $128,570 per year.

Salary by State

Move to California if you want to earn the highest salary in any state for network engineers. There, the salary was $60.26 per hour, on average, or $125,340 per year. Oregon network engineers could earn an average of $58.29 per hour, or $121,250 per year. New Jersey was in third place at $57.77 per hour, on average, or $120,150 per year. Check out Delaware as well, where the average mean hourly wage was $57.44, or $119,480 per year. Massachusetts wasn’t far behind with an average hourly wage of $56.33, or $117,160 per year.

Salary by Metro Area

Again, California is the best place to be if you want to live in high-paying metro areas. First, Santa Maria- Santa Barbara offered an hourly mean wage of $66.95, or $139,250 per year. Next, San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco paid an hourly mean wage of $66.68, or $138,690 per year. In third place was San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara at $66.60 per hour, on average, or $138,540 per year, while San Rafael came in close behind at $66.20 per hour, or $137,700 per year. Santa Rosa offered an average hourly wage of $64.42 per hour, or $133,990 per year.

Salary by Non-Metro Area

If big city life isn’t your thing, head to the northern Pennsylvania non-metro area, the highest-paying non-metro area in the country for network engineers at $47.14 per hour, on average, or $98,060 per year. If you prefer even colder weather, go to the northwestern Minnesota non-metro area that had an average hourly wage of $45.57, or $94,790 per hour. The Balance of the Lower Peninsula in Michigan had an average hourly wage of $44.95, or $93,500. Maybe you prefer the tropics? Relocate to the Hawaii/Kauai non-metro area, where the mean hourly wage was $42.74 per hour, on average, or $88,900 per year. If you prefer somewhere more temperate, the southern Ohio non-metro area paid an average of $42.07 per hour, or $87,510 per year.

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Salary Forecast: Cisco CCIE Engineers

by Steve Johnson 03/23/2018 0 comments

According to NHPrice.com, “[t]he Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert, or CCIE, is a technical certification offered by Cisco Systems. The CCIE certifies the skills required of network engineers to plan, operate and troubleshoot complex, converged network infrastructures on a wide variety of Cisco equipment.” Depending on who you talk to, the CCIE may or may not be all that it’s cracked up to be as far as increasing your salary, but for many, it’s considered an important certification to have to get a great job. The Bureau of Labor Statistics puts network engineers under the umbrella of computer network architects for job classification and salary purposes.

Salary The mean hourly wage for network engineers was $50.12, as of May 2016, according to the BLS, and the average annual salary was $104,240. The median hourly wage was $48.66, and it was $101,210 per year. The 10th percentile earned $26.74 per hour, or $55,610, and those in the 90th percentile earned $76.25 per hour, or $158,590 per year.

Salary by Industry

The industry of Specialized Design Services paid an average hourly salary of $84.57 per hour, or $175,900 per year. The Semiconductor and Other Electronic Component Manufacturing industry paid an

average hourly wage of $68.14, or $141,740 per year. In third place was the Commercial and Service Industry Machinery Manufacturing industry with an average hourly wage of $61.81, or $128,570 per year.

Salary by State

Network engineers earned the highest in the nation in California with a mean hourly wage of $60.26, or $125,340 per year. Oregon was in second place at $58.29 per hour, or $121,250 per hour. New Jersey was in third place at $57.77 per hour, or $120,150. Delaware was in fourth place at $57.44 per hour, on average, or $119,480 per year, and Massachusetts was in fifth place at $56.33 per hour, on average, or $117,160 per year.

Salary by Metro Area

California held the five highest spots for the best-paying metro areas in the country for network engineers. Santa Maria-Santa Barbara had an hourly mean wage of $66.95, or $139,250 per year. San Francisco-Redwood City-Couth San Francisco paid an hourly mean wage of $66.68, or $138,690 per year. Next was San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara at $66.60 per hour, on average, or $138,540 per year. San Rafael was in fourth place at $66.20 per hour, or $137,700 per year, and Santa Rosa held fifth place at $64.42 per hour, or $133,990 per year.

Salary by Non-Metro Area

The northern Pennsylvania non-metro area was the highest-paying non-metro area in the country for network engineers at $47.14 per hour, on average, or $98,060 per year. Northwest Minnesota was next at $45.57 per hour, on average, or $94,790. The Balance of the Lower Peninsula of Michigan non-metro area had an average hourly wage of $44.95, or $93,500. The Hawaii/Kauai non-metro area was in fourth place at $42.74 per hour, on average, or $88,900 per year. Finally, the southern Ohio non-metro area paid an average of $42.07 per hour, or $87,510 per year.

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