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Salary Forecast: Database Engineer

by Steve Johnson 02/19/2018 0 comments

Database engineers may also be known as database administrators. Many of their tasks overlap with those of database engineers, and some companies may give either title to a particular position. For the purposes of this article, database administrators and engineers are grouped together as it relates to salary. 

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics and Indeed.com, some of the responsibilities of database administrators and engineers include designing database systems, making sure the database is secure, creating a recovery process, and providing technical support. They also do regular maintenance on the system and establish database management processes, as well as provide user access. Additionally, they may combine old databases with new ones.  

To become a database engineer, most people earn a bachelor’s degree in a field like information technology or computer science, although some employers may not require a four-year degree. A master’s degree with an emphasis on databases and data may be preferred by some employers.  

Salary 

The 2017 ComputerWorld salary survey indicated that the national average for the job title of Database Developer/Modeler was $99,235, and it was $96,771 in 2016, an increase of 2.5 

As of May 2016, the median hourly wage for database engineers was $40.84, and it was $84,950 annually. The lowest 25th percentile made $29.97 per hour, or $62,350 per year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The highest 75th percentile earns $52.86 per hour, or $109,940 annually. The mean annual salary was $87,130, or $41.89 per hour.  

The Securities and Commodity Exchanges industry was the highest-paying industry for database engineers. The hourly wage was $54.94 per hour, or $114,280 per year. The Agents and Managers for Artists, Athletes, Entertainers, and Other Public Figures came in $54.31 per hour, on average, or $112,970 per year. The Beer, Win, and Distilled Alcoholic Beverage Merchant Wholesalers industry came in third place at $51.00 per hour, on average, or $106,070 per year.  

New Jersey was the highest-paying state, with an hourly mean wage of $51.61, or $107,340 per year. The District of Columbia was the second highest-paying at $48.74 per hour, on average, or $101,380 annually. Virginia came in third, and, there, the average hourly wage was $46.24, or $96,170 per year. Colorado paid the fourth highest among the states at $45.58 per hour, on average, or $94,810 per year. The fifth highest-paying state was California at $45.17 per hour, on average, or $93,960. 

The top three top-paying metropolitan areas were Trenton, NJ at $54.03 per hour, on average ($112,380 annually); Newark, NJ-PA at $53.68 per hour, on average ($111,660 per year), and San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, CA at $52.67 per hour, on average ($109,560). Midland, Texas was in fourth place at $51.27 per hour, on average ($106,530).  The Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV metro area paid an average of $50.06 per hour, or $104,130 per year. 

The southwest Colorado non-metropolitan area paid $42.21 per hour, on average ($87,810 per year) and was the highest-paying non-metro area in the country. The west northwestern Ohio nonmetropolitan area came in second at $41.60 per hour ($86,520 per year). The west Texas nonmetropolitan area pays the third-highest salaries for database engineers for non-metro areas at $40.93 per hour, on average, or $85,130 per year. The southeast Iowa non-metro area paid an average of $40.34 per hour, or $83,900 per hour and was in fourth place, while the west central New Hampshire non-metro area came in fifth at $39.99 per hour, on average, or $83,170.  

 

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Salary Forecast: Internal Auditor

by Steve Johnson 02/12/2018 0 comments

Internal auditors are in a pivotal position. They make sure financial controls within an organization work well, and they keep all of the records of business policies and processes, according to Indeed.com. They also work to better customer service by implementing advancements in the audit and financial control systems. Additionally, internal auditors make sure vulnerabilities don’t cause problems to the organization, and they come up with new forms of auditing and make suggestions about financial management. The Bureau of Labor Statistics states that they ensure an organization’s money is managed properly. 

You’ll need at least a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field to get started in this profession, and you may need a master’s in business administration with an accounting focus to work for some employers. Some programs offer internal auditing bachelor’s degrees. 

You may become a Certified Internal Auditor with the Institute of Internal Auditors when you have worked for 2 years in the position and pass a test.  

For statistical reporting purposes, the Bureau of Labor Statistics groups accountants and auditors in the same occupational category. The average hourly wage was $36.89, or $76,730 per year, as of May 2016. The median salary was an average of $68,150 per year, or $32.76 per hour.  Those earning in the lowest 25th percentile earned $20.60 per hour, or $53,240 per year, while those in the 75th percentile earned $90,670 per year, or $43.59 per year.  

The highest-paying industry was Other Investment Pools and Funds with an hourly mean wage of $49.01, or $101,950 per year. In second place was the Securities and Commodity Exchanges industry at $96,120 per year, on average, or $46.21 per hour. The Federal Executive Branch (OES Designation) came in third place at $46.07 per hour on average, and $95,810 per year.  

If you worked as an internal auditor in New York, you’d be living in the highest-paying state for this profession with an annual mean salary of $93,280 per year, or $44.85 per hour. The District of Columbia was in second place with an hourly average wage of $44.81, or $93,210 per year. New Jersey came in third place at $42.76 per hour, on average, or $88,940 per year. Fourth place belonged to Virginia at $40.09 per hour, on average, or $83,380 per year. The fifth highest-paying state was California at $39.72 per hour, or $82,620 per year, on average.  

The San Rafael, CA metropolitan area had the highest hourly mean wage for metro areas at $56.03, or $116,530 per year. Next came San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA at an average of $48.59 per hour, or $101,070 per year. The New York-Jersey City-White Plains, NY-NJ area came in third place at $47.35 per hour, on average, or $98,480 per year.  

The highest-paying non-metro area was southwestern Idaho at an average of $42.90 per hour, or $89,230 per year. Next was Nantucket Island and Martha’s Vineyard at $42.21 per hour, on average, or $85,720 per year. Third place belonged to southwestern Alaska at $39.92 per hour, on average, or $83,020 per year.  

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Salary Forecast: Senior Financial Analyst

by Steve Johnson 02/05/2018 0 comments

Financial analysts are at the forefront of business decisions. They are advisors to both businesses and individuals who want to make investments. They evaluate how well bonds, stocks, and other investments perform.  

To become a financial analyst, you’ll need at least a bachelor’s degree that provides classes in accounting, statistics, mathematics, economics, and finance, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. You’ll also need a license from the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority to sell financial products if you plan to go into the sell-side of financial analysis.  

Becoming certified as a Chartered Financial Analyst from the CFA Institute can also help you get promotions, which will put you on the track to earning the salary of a senior financial analyst. You’ll gain experience working in a particular investment area. Then you can work as a portfolio manager and choose the specific investments for an organization. You might also work as a fund manager for individuals. Finally, getting a master’s degree in finance or business administration can significantly boost your chances of becoming a senior financial analyst.  

Salary 

The median annual salary for financial analysts, as of May 2016, was $81,760, according to the BLS. The median hourly wage was $39.31. The average annual salary was $97,640, and the mean hourly wage was $46.94.  

Senior financial analysts typically earn on the higher end of the salary continuum for the position. The BLS states that those in the 75th percentile earned $53.73 per hour, or $111,760 per year. Those in the 90th percentile earned $165,100 per year, or $79.38 per hour.  

Those in the lowest 25th percentile earned $30.11 per hour, or $62,640, while those in the lowest 10th percentile earned $24.21 per hour, or $50,350. 

The industries where senior financial analysts could earn the most include Grantmaking and Giving Services, where the hourly mean wage was $68.68, and the annual mean wage was $142,850. Securities and Commodity Contracts Intermediation and Brokerage came in second at $63.16 per hour on average, or $131,370 per year. Other Investment Pools and Funds was third at $61.09 per hour, or $127,060. Lessors of Real Estate was the fourth highest-paying industry at $59.24 per hour, on average, and $123,210 per year. In fifth place was Other Financial Investment Activities at an average of $57.29 per hour, or $119,170 annually.  

The top paying states for financial analysts were: 1.) New York ($62.33 per hour, on average, and $129,640 per year), 2.) Colorado ($53.84 per hour, or $112,000 per year, on average), 3.) California ($52.72 per hour, or $109,650 per year, on average), 4.) Connecticut ($50.43 per hour, or $104,880 per year, on average), and 5.) the District of Columbia ($49.95 per hour, or $103,900 per year, on average). 

San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, CA was the highest-paying metropolitan area for financial analysts. There, they earned an hourly mean wage of $68.19 per hour, or $141,840 per year. Next came New York-Jersey City-White Plains, NY-NJ , where the average hourly salary was $64.00, or $133,130 per year. In third place was San Luis Obispo-Paso Robles-Arroyo Grande, CA , where the average hourly wage was $58.06, and the annual mean salary was $120,750. 

The top three non-metropolitan areas for salary were: 1.) southeast Alaska at $61.68 per year, on average, or $128,290 per year, 2.) west central New Hampshire at $51.22 per hour, on average, or $106,530 per year, and 3.) northern West Virginia at $46.13 per hour, on average, or $95,680 per year.  

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Salary Forecast: Enterprise Architect

by Steve Johnson 01/29/2018 0 comments

A three percent salary increase for those working in IT in 2017 is nothing to sneeze at, but it is a bit lower than the previous two years’ salary increases, according to the 2017 ComputerWorld IT Salary Survey. The annual IT job market gain was less than management consulting firm Janco Associates initially projected for 2017 compared to 2016. Janco Associates released its 2018 salary survey and noted that “IT compensation for all IT Professionals increased by 3.5%,” and “The IT job market is poised for expansion. We predict that the IT job market will grow by 84,000 net new jobs.”

All this is pretty good news for anyone in IT, even if there is a bit of a slowdown compared to the previous year or two, but what does it mean, specifically, for Enterprise Architects?

Enterprise Architects have a unique role in IT, connecting information technology and project management, according to Indeed.com. They work to identify goals, policies, projections, and procedures that are common to both departments. They formulate a summary of business assets, business development plans, and IT processes, along with other business operations to create changes to grow a company’s ability to sustain itself and to expand. They use architectural models and work in concert with executives to create standards and baselines. They also play an important role in talent management. Ultimately, they find new ways to improve the IT department to support a company’s future business goals and to help ensure it stays viable, innovative, and agile in the coming years.

In general, Indeed.com data from submissions to Indeed by Enterprise Architect employees, users, and job advertisements in the last two years indicates that the average salary for this occupation is $131,845 per year.

Entry-Level

According to ComputerWorld, the average annual salary of a typical Enterprise Architect in 2017 was $133,830. An Enterprise Architect with between one and four years of IT experience earned about an average of $98,000 per year. This included bonuses.  If you’re an Enterprise Architect with between five and nine years of experience working in IT, you can expect to earn about $132,333, on average, including bonuses. This is the 2017 figure, and the salary was just $122,913 for an Enterprise Architect fitting this profile in 2016, which is a 7.7% increase in overall salary.

Mid-Career

For those who have worked in IT for between 10 to 14 years, an Enterprise Architect could expect to earn $126,333 per year, on average, including bonuses, whereas the 2016 salary plus bonuses amount was $122,270. For those with between 15 and 19 years in IT, the average annual compensation was $135,357 in 2017, up 1.1% from $133,895 in 2016.

Bureau of Labor Statistics

While the Bureau of Labor Statistics doesn’t report on Enterprise Architects’ salaries specifically, they do publish data for Computer Systems Analysts, who “study an organization’s current computer systems and procedures, and design solutions to help the organization operate more efficiently and effectively. They bring business and information technology (IT) together by understanding the needs and limitations of both,” which is very similar to the job description of an Enterprise Architect.

Just using this as comparison with the ComputerWorld data, the 2016 median pay was $87,220 per year. The lowest 10 percent made less than $53,110 per year, and the 25th percentile earned an average of $67,460 per year. The 75th percentile made an average of $111,040 per year. The highest 10 percent made over $137,690. The average annual wage, according to the BLS, was $91,620.

New Jersey was the highest-paying state with an average annual salary for this occupation of $102,310. Next was California at $101,440, followed by the District of Columbia at $101,240 per year

The top-paying metro area was the San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, CA metropolitan division at $119,240 on average per year, followed by San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA at $116,530, and then Gainesville, GA at $116,400 per year, on average.

 

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Salary Forecast: Senior .NET Application Developer

by Steve Johnson 01/12/2018 1 comment

The future is looking pretty bright for information technology workers. Janco Associates estimates that the IT sector will increase by 84,000 new jobs in 2018, and there has been a 3.5% increase in the salaries of all IT workers, according to its 2018 salary survey. This salary increase is backed by the 2017 ComputerWorld IT Salary Survey that found a three percent increase in 2017. This increase is not as high as it was in 2016, but it still is good news for those working in IT

Specifically, however, what does that mean for Senior .NET Application Developers?

.NET Application Developers use C#, F#, or Visual Basic to create applications in .NET, which, according to Microsoft, “is a free, cross-platform, open source developer platform for building many different types of applications. With .NET, you can use multiple languages, editors, and libraries to build for web, mobile, desktop, gaming, and IoT.”

Senior .NET Application Developers do more than develop applications, however. They also help find and manage technology-based solutions for business problems. They use coding, testing, and implementing to create apps that meet client and functional requirements. They are skilled communicators as well as developers.

Salary

The salary for a Senior .NET Application developer can vary according to a variety of factors, including region, exact experience level, education, industry, company size, state of the economy, etc. However, if you look at the salaries for general application developers with five years to fewer than 10 years of experience in IT, the average national salary, according to a 2017 salary survey from ComputerWorld,  was $90,875, including bonuses, up from $90,168 the year before.

For application developers with 10 to fewer than 15 years of experience in iT, the 2017 average was $82,967, compared to $80,164 for 2016. The average salary of an application developer with 15 to 19 years of experience in IT was $93,285 in 2017, and it was $107,706 in 2016, according to the ComputerWorld survey.

Bureau of Labor Statistics

It’s important to take the ComputerWorld survey with a grain of salt and compare it with the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ data for software developers, the umbrella under which it includes application developers

The median annual wage for software developers was $100,080, as of May 2016. Those in the software publishing industry earned a median salary of $111,250, and those in manufacturing made a median of $107,280. The Finance and Insurance industry paid $101,520, and the Management of Companies and Enterprises industry paid a median of $98,020. Computer Systems Design and Related Services, as an industry, paid a median salary of $97,720 per year.

Experienced .NET Application Developers are likely to earn in the higher percentiles of the salary range, and according to the BLS, the lowest 10th percentile earned an average annual salary of $58,300, while those in the 25th percentile earned $76,170. The median was $100,080, as mentioned previously, and the 75th percentile earned $126,940 per year on average, while those in the 90th percentile earned an average of $157,590 per year. The average annual salary was $104,300

The top-paying states were as follows: Washington at $129,440 per year, California at $120,710 per year, Alaska at $119,120 per year, New York at $113,120 per year, and the District of Columbia at $112,040 annually. The San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA metropolitan area was the highest-paying metro area at $133,010, followed by Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, WA at $132,080, and Oakland-Hayward-Berkeley, CA at $131,160.

To get a more complete picture of what Senior .NET Application Developers are earning in your area, check local job advertisements.

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Salary Forecast: Network Systems Engineer

by Steve Johnson 01/09/2018 0 comments

If you’re a Network Systems Engineer, your future in IT is looking pretty good at the moment. In fact, the future is expected to be great for all IT workers. Janco Associates projects that there will be 84,000 new jobs added to the IT industry in 2018, and there has been a 3.5% increase in IT worker salaries, according to its 2018 salary survey. This good news is backed by the 2017 ComputerWorld IT Salary Survey, which reports a 3 percent increase in salaries. Although this isn’t as high as it was in the past couple of years, salaries are still on the rise.

Exactly how much do Network Systems Engineers earn, though, in the current economy?

Using data from the ComputerWorld 2017 salary survey, a network engineer with one to fewer than five years of IT experience can expect to earn an average of $58,500, up from $48,764 in 2016, including salary and bonuses.

Network engineers are “[r]esponsible for the engineering, configuration installation and administration of LAN/WAN networks,” according to ComputerWorld. They also provide support and troubleshooting help for network problems and daily administration of networks. Additionally, they create and put into place “large heterogeneous networks and [are] required to have significant expertise in designing and administering network hardware and software from vendors.”

That is a lot for an entry-level network systems engineer to handle, so with more experience often comes higher pay. With five to nine years of experience, the average salary in 2017 was $86,092, and in 2016, it was $83,069. With between 10 and 14 years of IT experience, a network engineer can expect an average salary of $89,186, including bonuses. This is up from $83,239 in 2016.  A typical network engineer with 15 to 19 years of IT experience can expect an average salary, including bonuses of $91,613, up from 2016’s total of $89,646.

Bureau of Labor Statistics

To compare the ComputerWorld data, take a look at the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ data for Computer Network Architects, a very similar position to network systems engineers. The median annual salary was $191,210, as of May 2016.

Working in the Wired Telecommunications Carriers industry, they earned a median of $107,830 and $107,420 in the Insurance Carriers and Related Activities industry. In the Management of Companies and Enterprises, they earned a median salary of $103,890, and in Computer Systems Design and Related Services, the median salary was $103,020. In the Educational Services; State, Local, and Private industry, the median salary was just $62,390.

The lowest tenth percentile earned an average annual salary of $55,610, while those in the 25th percentile earned $74,970. The median salary, as stated before, was $101,210, and those in the 75th percentile earned an average of $128,820. Those in the 90th percentile earned an average of $158,590 per year. The average annual salary was $104,240.

These were the highest-paying states: California at $125,340 per year, on average; Oregon at $121,250; New Jersey at $120,150, Delaware at $119,480, and Massachusetts at $117,160.  The top-paying metro areas were Santa Maria-Santa Barbara, CA at $139,250 per year, on average, followed by San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, CA at $138,690, and San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA at $138,540 annually.

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Salary Forecast: IT Project Manager

by Steve Johnson 01/03/2018 0 comments

Information technology industry jobs and salaries seem to be on the rise. Janco Associates projects in its 2018 salary survey that “the IT job market will grow by 84,000 net new jobs,” and it reported a 3.5% increase in salary for all IT professionals. The 2017 ComputerWorld IT Salary Survey indicated a three percent salary increase for IT workers in 2017, so it seems like salaries are on the rise, although they did not grow as much as they did in the previous couple of years.

This makes for good news for anyone in IT, but what does it mean for IT Project Managers, in particular?

Project Managers in IT come up with the standards, budgets, and timetables for IT projects. They are in charge of all steps of projects, from delegating tasks to employees, procuring equipment and materials, to making sure that the project meets quality requirements. They ensure that the job is done on time and within budget, according to ComputerWorld.

In general, the average annual salary for an IT Project Manager is $89,405 per year, according to Indeed.com. This information comes from salaries that IT Project Managers, users, and job advertisements from the previous two years have submitted to Indeed.

Bureau of Labor Statistics

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that, in 2016, the median pay was $135,800 per year. Those who earned in the lowest tenth percentile made less than $82,360 per year, and those in the 25th percentile earned an average of $105,290 per year. The 75th percentile made an average of $170,670 annually, and the 90th percentile earned more than $208,000. The BLS reports that the average annual wage is $145,740.

In the Information industry, the median pay was $150,190, and it was $143,040 in Computer Systems Design and Related Services. In Finance and Insurance, the median pay was $142,890, and it was $139,540 in Manufacturing. In the Management of Companies and Enterprises industry, the median pay was $136,690.

Experience Level

For an IT project manager with between one and four years of experience in IT, the average annual salary, according to ComputerWorld in 2017, is $77,667, up 0.4% from $77,340 the year before. For those with between five and nine years of experience in IT, the average annual salary was $80,000 in 2017, up from $77,857 in 2016. If a project manager has worked in IT between 10 and 14 years, they can expect to earn an average of $119,336, according to the 2017 numbers, up from $116,924 in 2016. For those with between 15 and 19 years of experience in IT, the average annual salary is about $105,073, according to the 2017 survey, up from $102,043 in 2016.

Geography

The top-paying state for IT project managers was New York in 2016, where the average annual wage was $175,530, followed by California at $169,420 per year, and New Jersey at $168,520. Virginia was next on the list at $163,880, and Delaware was the fifth highest-paying state at $161,360.

The highest-paying metro area was San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA at $195,260 per year, followed by SanFrancisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco, CA at $195,180, and New York-Jersey City-White Plains, NY-NJ at $185,340 per year, on average.

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Adjusting and Managing Client Expectations

by Steve Johnson 12/14/2017 0 comments

Your clients expect you to deliver a service that can be very difficult to provide: a solid employee who is worth keeping. Finding such a person when the available talent pool is good is hard enough. When the talent pool is a bit smaller, it’s just that much more difficult to help your client find the right employee. Helping your client understand what is realistic and possible is vital to having a good and continuing relationship with them.

Agree on Terms

Make sure that your clients agree, first, to your terms for payment. You don’t want to end up with a client who says that they are a bit low on money at the moment, and, while they thank you for finding Employee X, they aren’t worth the bill that you’re sending.

Talk about Process

Engage your client in a discussion about how the entire recruiting process works at your company from recruiting, to interviewing, to offering/negotiating, to onboarding. How are you going to operate at each stage of the process?

Talk about Ad Copy

Talk to your client about the ad copy. It’s another part of the essential open line of communication. If they don’t like how you’ve portrayed the company or the job, they can provide some extra feedback. After all, they are the one who knows their company and the position better than anyone. That collaboration can be just what is needed to get the right person hired.

Discuss sourcing

Discuss sourcing with your client. Some of them might just want a list of names, a short work history, and some social media information about them. Others want you to have engaged every person on the list yourself and asked them about their level of interest in the job.

Who Will Do Reference Checks?

You should also talk about who is going to conduct the reference checks: you or the client. Maybe both of you? You might do a reference check before you turn in any short list to the client, but the client may want to do one themselves.

What about Negotiation?

Discuss who will do the negotiating. Who will offer the job and make the compensation package offer? You can end up turning off potentially good candidates who are confused about who to turn to in the offer/negotiation phase of their job search, and they may go somewhere else.

Learn about the Client

In your discussions with clients, find out about the organization. Ask about the problems the employer wants to solve by hiring this person. What is the meaning of success in the company, and what are the characteristics of a stellar employee there? If the company has a high turnover rate, you’re going to have to find a way to convince top talent to take a chance and work there. What does the company have to offer? This can be a delicate topic, but it’s necessary if the company wants to recruit the best that is available in a competitive environment.

Be Realistic Yourself

Finally, avoid telling your client that you will give them a list of a certain number of great candidates. You have to be realistic and cautious if you expect your clients to be. People are unpredictable, so your plan for recruiting them must be carefully laid out. Anticipate problems like scheduling interview times or a candidate accepting anoffer somewhere else. Try to have a back-up candidate ready in the wings to fill the position if the top choice decides to work somewhere else.

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American Onshoring is Trending Upwards

by Steve Johnson 12/11/2017 0 comments

Moving labor to cheaper countries like China has been going on for decades, but there has been a trend to bring some of that labor back to the United States. Initially, it seemed as if there were benefits for both countries: workers had jobs and could feed their families in the less labor-expensive countries, and consumers in the U.S. could pay lower prices for products and services they wanted as a result.

For the past few years, however, onshoring labor back to the United States has become more popular.

According to Joe A. Hollingsworth, Jr. of the Hollingsworth Companies, “manufacturing output accounted for 19% of the economy [in the U.S.] in 2000; and, as of 2012, it has hovered around 11%.”This large drop in manufacturing done in America caused factories to shut down and sometimes even entire communities to just about dry up.
The reason for the change, according to Hollingsworth, is that American manufacturing is becoming more competitive compared to that in developing countries. The gap of what it costs to produce something in China compared to the U.S. has been decreasing. When you look at factors like supply chain interruption due to events like weather, strikes, etc., having a manufacturing plant in the U.S. does seem more attractive in some important regards.
Additionally, the lower costs of energy in the U.S. with the rise of fracking and natural gas has made the U.S. more competitive. Another important factor is that the productivity of American workers has increased in recent years, 30% from 1997 to 2008, according to Hollingsworth.
Onshoring has also become more popular because quality control can be difficult to regulate in foreign environments. Companies have to constantly send employees over to countries where manufacturing takes place to check on quality control, and the number and type of stories that indicate that all is not what it seems on the surface has helped increase the onshoring trend.

Wages have actually increased in developing countries as well. According to The Atlantic, “wages in China are some five times what they were in 2000—and they are expected to keep rising 18 percent a year.”

Additionally, unions in the U.S. are changing their priorities. They aren’t as focused on striking and are more focused on negotiating.

One example of the onshoring trend is GE’s Appliance Park in Louisville, Kentucky. It was largely abandoned in recent years, after its 1950s and 1960s heyday. Recently, some of its lines have reopened, making water heaters and dishwashers, among other products.
However, some are still waiting for the “help wanted” signs to appear. The factories are moving back to the United States, but many are waiting for the factories to actually open and to start hiring more workers.

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How to Land a New Job for 2018 without Losing Your Year-End Bonus

by Steve Johnson 12/08/2017 0 comments

Thanksgiving to New Years is a sort of dead man’s land when it comes to hiring and finding a new job. If you’re currently employed at a place where you’re going to get a year-end bonus, but you still want a new job, don’t despair. Since things are likely to be slow in the job market anyway this time of year, postpone giving notice at your current job just a little longer.

Reconnect

During this time of year, you should renew old personal and professional relationships. With more time off of work and the festive atmosphere, you’re sure to be able to meet up with some of them at parties or go out for coffee. Pick up the phone and have a conversation with a few people. Text someone to see how they’re doing. Avoid telling everyone that you’re looking for a new job in your conversations. You don’t want people thinking that you’re meeting up with them just for that reason. Instead, if the opportunity presents itself, tactfully let them know you’re looking for new professional opportunities.

Revise

Additionally, it’s a good time to update your cover letter draft and resume. Did you complete any continuing education training this year? Did you present at any conferences? Are the verbs in your cover letter and resume as action-oriented as possible? Do you describe what you accomplished at your current job using numbers and other specifics? Get someone to proofread your resume and cover letter, and then find someone else to read through it. You don’t want any typos, and you want to present yourself as the candidate that brings the most to the organization.

Review

How are you at interviewing? Have you had any practice recently? If so, what was the feedback from the employers? Get someone you know with experience interviewing people to do a mock interview with you. If you don’t know anyone, record and view yourself answering common interview questions that a friend reads to you.

Read.

During your down time during the holidays, read as much as possible on the news, blogs, on the research and about us pages on the websites of the companies you’re interested in. Look carefully at job descriptions of the position you want to make sure your resume matches up with the desired skills and experiences. Sign up for news alerts on Google for the companies that interest you and on your favorite job search sites for daily notifications of new jobs in your field. Don’t forget to check the job boards of professional associations, trade journals, and job boards dedicated just to your field.

Remember that you may not even get your bonus. A good company will let you know as soon as possible if it doesn’t have the financial means to do so, but don’t count on getting your bonus until it’s in the bank. In the meanwhile, continue to search for the right job for you, and, if you’re sure you’re going to get that bonus, and that’s all that’s holding to your current job, consider sticking it out until the New Year.

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